What can I use instead of their?

Well, unless you need the word to be possessive, you could use “the.” For examples, “ all of their cars are the same make and model,” which to me would mean this group of people all drive the same make and model car.

Is it correct to say this is she or this is her?

“This is she” is grammatically correct. The verb “to be” acts as a linking verb, equating subject and object. So this is she and she is this; “she” and “this” are one and the same, interchangeable, and to be truly interchangeable they must both play the same grammatical role—that of the subject.

Who’s she or who’s her?

“Who is she” is correct. By using “who she is” you are actually describing a woman/girl, implying a direct opinion or stating a certain characteristic about her. By using the “who is she” is asking what is the identity of that woman/girl that you are trying to know about.

Which is correct her husband or his husband?

Some people might thing it needs to be “his husband” because both are male, but once you remember that we don’t ever change things based on the noun being modified, it will be easier to remember that “her” applies to the person who has the husband.

Which is correct he and his wife or him and his wife?

It depends on whether the phrase is used as an object or a subject. Basically, if the two of them are doing something, it’s “he and his wife.” If something is being done to them, it’s “him and his wife.” For example: He and his wife are going to Tokyo next week.

What is difference between him and his?

We use pronouns such as “he, him, and his” while talking about a person particularly male. The word “his” is used either as a pronoun or an adjective however, The word “him,” on the other hand, is the objective form of the pronoun “he.” Ex: He has a camera. The camera belongs to him.

How do you know when to use him or he?

Using “Him” in Sentences. Where there is a “he,” there is a “him.” Much like “he,” “him” is also a third-person masculine pronoun. However, “him” is an object pronoun for the subject pronoun “he.” Sound confusing? Don’t worry, it will get clearer.

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